Would a walk to school zone ease the jams?

Would a walk to school zone ease the jams?

A 500 metre wide zone around local schools – in which children are persuaded to walk or cycle to school – is just one idea being put forward to ease the traffic effect caused by so many vehicles transporting youngsters to both state and private Bath schools in the east of the city.

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London Road traffic

 

Transition Larkhall are involved in a a year-long study investigating – amongst other things – how parents take their children to school and why they choose to travel that way.

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Deadmill Lane is one of the roads surveyed.

 In conjunction with the University of Bath and the South West Foundation, this local community body – part of a world-wide transition movement which is working towards a post-oil economy –  surveyed traffic on 4 successive Mondays between 7.00am and 10.00am, at the Gloucester/London Road junction and on Dead Mill lane.

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Transition Larkhall have held two local meetings to explain to the community the results of the survey.

The Study Coordinator – Joanna Wright – told Bath Newseum what they had discovered.

You can read a full report of the survey as it was presented to the West of England Joint Transport Study Consultation via http://transitionlarkhall.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/West-of-England-Transport-Consultation.pdf

There’s more information – via Transition Bath – on http://transitionbath.org/transition-larkhall-analysis-show-50-baths-rush-hour-traffic-can-attributed-schools/

 

A fairer share of Bath buses?

A fairer share of Bath buses?

Getting around inner city Bath has not been easy of late with traffic greatly affected by the resurfacing work in North Road.

This vital arterial route reopens early on Friday morning – October 28th – and one hopes things might ease.

However, there is no way we can kid ourselves that this town can cope for much longer with the volume of commercial and private traffic it is being asked to accommodate.

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Bus after bus caught in today’s jams.

While millions are soon to be wasted on another park and ride  – which will take a few cars  off the London Road –  it doesn’t deal with the biggest need.

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Wouldn’t take many of these to bring our city to a standstill.

Historic Bath is crying out for a relief road – a proper by-pass – and some effective traffic management.

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Coaches and buses caught up on North Parade.

I couldn’t believe how many huge buses were caught up in today’s jams.

It was a regular convoy of one passenger-carrying vehicle after another. Many of them part of the subsidised service which ships students in and out of the city. Both of our universities have been built out of town.

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More jams in West Street.

And while our under graduates get a regular flow of transport to and from academia – the residents of Larkhall district fight to retain their more modest connection with town.

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There is a public meeting tonight – October 26th – at St Saviours Infant School – attended by  James Freeman who is Managing Director of First Bus, and  Cllr Anthony Clark who is B&NES Cabinet member for  transport.

 

Good news for rusting Larkhall play area

Good news for rusting Larkhall play area

At last some good news regarding a pile of rusting  childrens’ play equipment in Larkhall that is sadly in need of replacement – something Bath Newseum raised a couple of years ago!

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B&NES are inviting people to express their thoughts on designs drawn up for what should replace it.

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The date given is Saturday, September 17th – between 2 and 4 pm – at the St Saviours Road play area in Larkhall.

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Apparently they will also take suggestions for ways to upgrade Alice Park as well!

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At this rate – they ( not the Parks Department of course)  might also get around to sorting out the dangerous traffic flow on nearby Ferndale Road!!

Smoothing the way through Larkhall.

Smoothing the way through Larkhall.

What a difference a new road surface makes!

Here’s the main road – St Saviour’s – into the ‘village’ of Larkhall – after its recent tarmac renovation.

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So smooth.

Before and after.

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The former surface of St Saviour’s Road into Larkhall, Bath.

Drop the East of Bath park and ride scheme and you would have enough cash to re-do all the roads of Bath!

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Wow!

What do others think?

Use cash from Park and Ride to mend our roads!

Use cash from Park and Ride to mend our roads!

Here’s a close-up of the surface of at least part of St Saviours Road running into Larkhall. It’s typical of a lot of streets in the Bath area subjected to pounding traffic and poor maintenance.

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The surface of St Saviour’s Road into Larkhall, Bath.

My own road – at the other end of the village – is just as bad. The white ‘indicators’ – used to mark the potholes that need filling – were sprayed around the craters so long ago they have almost faded away.

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The surface of our road – the white ‘indicators’ are fading away!

I spend a lot of time going around our World Heritage city on two wheels and there is no better way of ‘feeling’ the surface. Here’s part of Great Pulteney Street – rapidly in danger of losing its ‘celebrity’ road name status.

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Pulteney Street is not looking so “Great” anymore – try riding along it on two wheels!

Road repairs cost money. So will someone please have the courage to say the East of Bath park and ride scheme is dead in the ground and spend the money on something useful.

By all means put in some mini ‘parks ‘ on the Box Road  – where farmers might be pleased to sell the odd parcel of land – and concentrate your energies on getting the link road between the A46 and A36.

It has been pointed out to me that the Batheaston Bypass came with a link road at the Bath end but – for whatever reason – only half that proposal was built.

Here’s an image from the fabulous Bath in Time collection and a link through to the original image.

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The approved route for the A46 / A36 link road and Batheaston Bypass 1990 http://www.bathintime.co.uk/image/315910/the-approved-route-for-the-a46-a36-link-road-and-batheaston-bypass-1990  Only the Batheaston / Swainswick bypass was built, the A36 link road was not. 

Passed by the Highways Agency but never implemented and subsequently appealed, would this have solved the traffic problems in Bath today? 
As this intersection is on the land earmarked for the Eastern Park & Ride, it is unclear whether this scheme could ever be resurrected.

 

Someone told me B&NES have committed themselves to a Park and Ride East of Bath but l have to say there is no shame in a U-turn – the Government do it all the time!

 

New life for Larkhall loo!

New life for Larkhall loo!

A former public convenience in Larkhall has been given a new lease of life thanks to Bath & North East Somerset Council and two enterprising local women.

The toilets, at Larkhall Square, were in poor repair and were closed in July 2014. Local residents, Lucinda Niel and Kirstie Clarke, put forward a proposal to run a small shop and maintain a public toilet on the site.

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The former public convenience in Larkhall.

The shop is now open selling children’s toys, gifts and homeware, and the free unisex public toilet again available for use.

Cllr Martin Veal (Conservative Bathavon North), the Council’s Cabinet Member for Community Services, said: “This is good news – by working with the new tenants and the community, as well as current and previous ward councillors, we have been able to keep a public toilet on site as well as providing a new shop for local people. This is a great example of working innovatively with the local community.”

The toilet cubicle is disability compliant, has baby changing facilities, and will be open from 9am to 5pm Monday to Saturday.

 

Convenience store

Convenience store

A former public loo in Larkhall is being given a new lease of life thanks to Bath & North East Somerset Council and two enterprising local women.

The former public convenience in Larkhall.

The former public convenience in Larkhall.

The toilets, at Larkhall Square, were in poor repair and were closed in July 2014. Local residents, Lucinda Niel and Kirstie Clarke, put forward a proposal to run a small shop and maintain a public toilet on the site.

The Council agreed to carry out the conversion works, which have now been completed. Credit must also be given to two former local councillors – Bryan Chalker and Dave Laming – who lent their active support to saving the building.

Cllr Martin Veal (Conservative Bathavon North), the Council’s Cabinet Member for Community Services, said: “We wanted to see the former public convenience put to good use. By working with the new tenants we have been able to ensure a public toilet is maintained on the site, as well as providing a new shop for local people.”

The tenants have now picked up the keys and are busy fitting out their lifestyle shop, which will sell children’s toys, gifts and homeware.

The doorway into the new shop unit!

The doorway into the new shop unit!

The free unisex public toilet, which is disability compliant and has baby changing facilities, will be open from 9am to 5pm Monday to Saturday.
The tenants will be in charge of unlocking, locking, cleaning and supplying soap and toilet rolls.

The toilets and shop are expected to open later this month.