Bridge crack? We’re keeping an eye on it says Council.

Bridge crack? We’re keeping an eye on it says Council.

Well, l have finally had my official answer from B&NES regarding the sorry state of the stone balustrade alongside Pulteney Bridge – and regarding the crack in the stone facade to one side of this Grade 1 listed structure’s first span over the River Avon.

IMG_6711

The crack is below the cafe window and above one side of the first bridge span.

Here’s the statement from the Press Office.

“Pulteney Bridge is subject to regular inspections, in accordance with nationally adopted standards.

The vegetation growing on the structure will be removed in a future programme of maintenance work.

The minor crack in the shop façade was identified through the inspection regime and is subject to ongoing monitoring.”

Well, l still think it is getting wider!

IMG_6699

Hopefully, you can see the crack in the horizontal seam between the masonry.

It’s a shame the balustrade wasn’t subject to regular inspections too. It might have prevented the weeds from growing so well.

IMG_6713

Here’s the view – looking through the cafe window.

Pulteney Bridge was designed by Robert Adam in a Palladian style. It was completed in 1774 and connected the city with the newly built Georgian town of Bathwick.

It is one of only four such bridges in the world in having shops built across its full span on both sides.

It is one of the most iconic structures in our World Heritage city and a favourite tourist spot for taking ‘selfies’.

 

 

Bath Rugby appoint architects for new stadium.

Bath Rugby appoint architects for new stadium.

 

The architectural firm responsible for designing the contemporary part of Bath’s Thermae Spa will be back in the city for another ground breaking project.

bath spa

Thermae Bath Spa

Grimshaw Architects have been selected to deliver the new stadium for Bath Rugby.

Screen Shot 2018-01-09 at 18.23.03

A page from the Grimshaw website.

The Club has today announced:

“Following a rigorous selection process, Stadium for Bath – the project that brings together Bath Rugby, Bath Rugby Foundation and Arena 1865 – has appointed globally renowned firm Grimshaw as lead architect to realise the vision for a new community focused stadium in the heart of Bath – a certified UNESCO World Heritage Site.”

Screen Shot 2018-01-09 at 18.21.21

One of the architectural projects featured on the Grimshaw website.

Multi award-winning firm Grimshaw – whose design credentials span across the globe – have been appointed to develop plans for an exceptional new stadium, with a target capacity of 18,000, which will replace Bath Rugby’s current facilities at the Recreation Ground in the City of Bath.

Screen Shot 2018-01-09 at 18.22.09

Another web page from the Grimshaw on-line site.

Grimshaw’s current and previous experience includes sporting destinations such as the Wimbledon Master Plan, including No1 Court, the Curragh Racecourse; and the delivery of projects in sensitive heritage locations such as Thermae Bath Spa and the recently approved changes to the grade II-Listed former Herman Miller factory for Bath Spa University.

IMG_6736

Bath Rugby’s current facilities at the Rec.

Stadium for Bath say they undertook a rigorous architect selection process. Design credentials and design process were key to selection but equal importance was placed on the individuals, the team and the way they work. In addition, as part of the pre-design listening process Stadium for Bath asked stakeholders, including local residents and supporters, to list their considerations for appointing a lead architect and design team.

The project team reviewed a long list of top-name architects and specifically engaged with eight as part of the selection process. A fundamental quality of the winning architect was the demonstration of its ability to listen and collaborate with all stakeholders as part of the design process.

IMG_6734

Bath Rugby at the Recreation Ground.

Stadium for Bath intends to submit a final design for planning approval during 2018.

Commenting on today’s announcement Tarquin Mcdonald, Bath Rugby Chief Executive said:

“This project is about a Club that plays its rugby and lives in the heart of Bath – a World Heritage site – and has done so for over 150 years. However, if we want to continue to be Bath Rugby and remain in the heart of this unique city we must be so much more than a rugby club. Stadium for Bath is about delivering a new home for Bath Rugby but it is clear that this project is goes beyond that. It is about rugby as a catalyst for riverside regeneration in the centre of Bath and the provision of significant community benefits that create a legacy for everyone whether or not they are rugby supporters.

Unknown

Tarquin Mcdonald, CEO for Bath Rugby.

“We have spent months undertaking a robust architect selection process and believe that we now have the best team in place to design an amazing place to watch rugby and a truly exceptional destination that will become a jewel in the city’s crown.

“We will now accelerate the design process and we look forward to consulting with stakeholders across the city, including local residents and our supporters, as we all work together to create a brilliant legacy for Bath.”

Kirsten Lees, Partner at Grimshaw

“We very much look forward to working with Stadium for Bath to deliver this hugely prestigious and exciting project. The site’s sensitive and complex location demands a very special and unique design response in order to deliver the project’s aspirational objectives. The scheme is set to deliver wider benefits to the city including riverside regeneration and an enhanced relationship with the Recreation Ground in order to provide an exceptional new home for Bath Rugby, emblematic of its place, its community and the UNESCO World Heritage City of Bath.”

The design aesthetic and stadium experience will be fundamental to the overall design solution. It is clear that the smart use of space at the site, the design of internal and operational spaces, and the landscape setting of the stadium will also be essential components of a successful design. Grimshaw has therefore appointed two further practices, Kay Elliot and Gross Max, as sub-contractors to provide further design expertise on this unique project.

Kay Elliot has been appointed Destination and Interiors Architect. Kay Elliot will have overarching responsibility for designing the internal look and feel of the new stadium. Internal areas include hospitality, player areas, bars and toilets, together with non-matchday uses such as conferencing and banqueting.

Gross Max has been appointed to lead on riverside design and the public realm to ensure that they are delivered to an exceptional standard befitting Bath.

Visit www.stadiumforbath.com for more information.

Classic look at architecture – in miniature.

Classic look at architecture – in miniature.

The city’s iconic Royal Crescent is celebrating its 250th anniversary this year and – as part of a whole year full of special events – Bath Preservation Trust have just opened a special exhibition which features classical architecture in miniature.

bath preservation trust

Guests admiring some of the models on display.

From Rome to the Royal Crescent traces the evolution of classical architecture from the ancient monuments of Rome, through the innovation of the Renaissance to the modern designs of 18th century Britain through the beautiful work of model maker Timothy Richards.

p1160374

Timothy Richards was on hand to answer questions about his models on display.

When the foundation stone was laid for the Royal Crescent in 1767 British architecture was dominated by a passion for Palladianism.

A fashionable style for both grand country houses and city structures, 18th century Palladianism was inspired by the buildings of ancient Greece and Rome as interpreted by Renaissance architects such as Andrea Palladio.

Through highly detailed models of some the key buildings in this story of stylistic development, this exhibition will reveal why the iconic Royal Crescent looks the way it does.

p1160384

Villa Rotonda – one of Timothy’s exquisite models.

Based in Bath, Timothy Richards specialises in telling the story of architecture through model making and has spent over 25 years refining his craft. The workshop has completed over 150 projects for both private and public commissioners.

p1160373

Another part of the display at No 1 Royal Crescent.

The exhibition is being held at No 1 Royal Crescent through to June 4th.  Bath Newseum spoke to its curator, Dr Amy Frost, during a special preview evening.

Find out more about the skills and processes behind the extraordinary work of Tim and his team of craftsmen at www.timothyrichardscommissions.com or visit this unique workshop.

Discover more  information about opening times at No 1 Royal Crescent  via  http://no1royalcrescent.org.uk/events/

From Rome to the Royal Crescent.

From Rome to the Royal Crescent.

Models of classical buildings tell the story of architecture from Rome to the Royal Crescent in Bath

From Rome to the Royal Crescent launches a special year for Bath, celebrating the 250th anniversary of the Royal Crescent.  It is an exhibition at No. 1 Royal Crescent, tracing the evolution of classical architecture from the ancient monuments of Rome, through the innovation of the Renaissance to the modern designs of 18th century Britain through the beautiful work of Bath-based model maker Timothy Richards.

img_6254

Royal Crescent – view of a model made by Bath-based model maker Timothy Richards.

His intricate models include a perfect replica of the Royal Crescent itself reflecting its monumental proportions and classical façade.

When the foundation stone was laid for the Royal Crescent in May 1767 British architecture was dominated by a passion for Palladianism.  A fashionable style for both grand country houses and city structures, 18th century Palladianism was inspired by the buildings of ancient Greece and Rome as interpreted by Renaissance architects such as Andrea Palladio, the Italian stone mason from Vicenza who became the most influential architect in the Western world. Through highly detailed models of some of the key buildings in this story of stylistic development, this exhibition will reveal why the iconic Royal Crescent looks the way it does.

villa-cornaro

Queens House, Greenwich – another perfect replica by Timothy Richards.

Timothy Richards says:

Children love models and react in a fundamental way. They, like us, are delighted by beauty and this exhibition is about beauty. The unique plaster models tell a simple story well, giving not only an understanding of a journey but also revealing the art of great architecture and our abiding love affair and debt to Italy and Rome.”

Great models combine not only passion and understanding but also something of the real building; an art form in their own right.’  

Based in Bath, Timothy Richards specialises in telling the story of architecture through model making and has spent over 25 years refining his craft. The workshop has completed over 150 projects for both private and public commissioners.

In 2013, Richards won the Arthur Ross Award, the US Institute of Classical Architecture and Art prize for artisanship in the classical tradition.

Find out more about the skills and processes behind the extraordinary work of Tim and his team of craftsmen at www.timothyrichardscommissions.com or visit this unique workshop.

pantheon-model-by-timothy-richards

The Pantheon in Rome – as modelled by Timothy Richards.

  

FACTS

Exhibition: From Rome to the Royal Crescent

Dates: 11 February until 4 June 2017

Location: No. 1 Royal Crescent, Bath, BA1 2LR

Free with admission to the museum: Adult £10; Child £4; Family £22

http://www.no1royalcrescent.org.uk

aerial-of-rc-and-circus2

An aerial view of Bath featuring the Royal Crescent and Circus.

Be Social: #RoyalCrescent250 @No1Museum

#RoyalCrescent250 celebratory events continue all year, with further exhibitions, debates, community events, guided walks and artworks exploring the enduring power of a single building. Primarily focused in and around Bath Preservation Trust’s three city-centre museums, there are also activities in partnerships with Bath Festivals, RIBA South West and The Natural Theatre Company.

Bath’s 2017 is going to be Crescent shaped.

Bath’s 2017 is going to be Crescent shaped.

On May 19th, 1767 the foundation stone was laid for the construction of what many would now consider to be Bath’s most iconic Georgian building.

p1130420

So 2017  has a 250th anniversary to celebrate and – thanks to a Heritage Lottery Fund award and other donations – Bath Preservation Trust – in collaboration with other cultural organisations – will be leading a whole host of walks, talks, exhibitions and free public events to mark this architectural date in history.

screen-shot-2016-12-14-at-09-38-13

News of the foundation stone being laid from the Bath Chronicle.

Caroline Kay, Chief Executive of the Trust, outlined plans at an informal meeting of representatives of other cultural organisations, held at the Holburne Museum.

img_0992

The informal gathering at the Holburne Museum getting a briefing on next year’s anniversary plans.

She is anxious to encourage other bodies to come on board and maybe work in some reference to the Royal Crescent in whatever programme of events they may be planning for next year.

Print

The 250th anniversary logo

She also unveiled the logo the Trust will be using to promote the planned celebrations – which also coincide with the 30th anniversary of Bath’s inscription by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

img_0993

Bath Preservation Trust Chief Executive Caroline Kay unveils the 250th anniversary logo for the Royal Crescent.

There is much to be finalised and an official launch in the New Year – once the exact HLF funding has been determined  – but here is a rough idea of some of what is in store from a  Bath Preservation Trust briefing:

“No other building represents the architectural innovation, social identity and creative imagination of Georgian Britain better than the Royal Crescent in Bath.  The foundation stone for this masterpiece of 18th century design was laid on 19th May 1767 and since then it has become one of the most famous buildings in Britain. 

It stands as a doorway through which the history of the Georgian period can be discovered and the architecture of the future inspired. 

p1130421

Via exhibitions, debates, events and artworks the museums of Bath Preservation Trust will lead a year-long city-wide celebration of the Royal Crescent’s 250th anniversary – which also coincides with the 30th anniversary of Bath’s inscription by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Working in collaboration with other cultural organisations the celebrations will include over 70 events so far with lectures, walks, workshops and film screenings. There will be concerts and illuminations – even a grand parade.

I will keep Bath Newseum followers in the picture, but do also keep an eye on the Bath Preservation Trust website http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/http://www.bath-preservation-trust.org.uk/

Help shape our housing & transport future.

Help shape our housing & transport future.

People in the West of England are being urged to take the opportunity to shape the area’s housing and transport provision for the next 20 years by participating in a major consultation that starts next week [Monday, 9 November].

Leaders of the area’s four local authorities today encouraged residents to give their views on emerging options for the provision of new homes and associated infrastructure.

New homes at Bath's Western Riverside.

New homes at Bath’s Western Riverside.

The West of England needs to plan for more homes if it is to meet the area’s growing need for housing and continue to be economically successful. It has been calculated that the area will need 85,000 new homes by 2036. With 56,000 currently planned or approved, options as to where a further 29,000 homes could be built are being explored.

This plan is about delivering the homes needed for future generations: affordable, well-designed, well-located and well-connected.

The options are part of councils’ emerging Joint Spatial Plan and Transport Study which form the basis of their consultation to shape the development of housing, employment space, transport and infrastructure provision until 2036.

They have been set out on a series of indicative maps for people to examine during the three-month consultation. Although all options are up for discussion and debate, partners agree that the focus for new housing should be on previously developed land to minimise the need for developing green space.
Leaders from each of the four local authorities welcomed the launch of the public consultation.

Cllr Tim Warren Leader of B&NES.

Cllr Tim Warren
Leader of B&NES.

Cllr Tim Warren, Leader of Bath and North East Somerset Council, said: “We want to ensure that as many people as possible give us their views to ensure our plans reflect what is deliverable, address local issues and reflect local opinion. We need to focus on using brownfield sites – alongside delivering affordable housing, jobs, and supporting infrastructure for our growing communities.”

George Ferguson, Mayor of Bristol, said: “My ultimate goal is to make Bristol one of the world’s most liveable cities. It is, therefore, encouraging that we are working as a city region, planning across local authority boundaries to deliver the affordable housing, land for business growth and the necessary transport and community infrastructure we need to create sustainable communities.

“We need to do this whilst protecting our natural environment both within the city and in the surrounding areas. This consultation is a great opportunity for people from across the West of England to find out more about the possible options and let us know what they think, and I look forward to hearing people’s views.”

Cllr Nigel Ashton, Leader of North Somerset Council, said: “The role of the Green Belt in maintaining the separation of settlements and in defining the character of local communities is highly valued by our residents. The council’s strong preference is to continue to protect the Green Belt as an effective long-term approach to managing development while supporting the need for accelerated housing delivery in sustainable locations.

“I urge residents to get involved and help shape the future of the area by making their views known during the consultation process.”

Cllr Matthew Riddle, Leader of South Gloucestershire Council, said: “We want to build a better future for our children, to ensure they have the same or better access to homes and jobs we have now. At the same time, we want to protect our environment and prioritise development close to supporting infrastructure.

“Together, we can do both. We should not shy away from this, but take the initiative and tackle these issues now, so that people in every part of the region and future generations can enjoy a sustainable future. The plan sets out an ambitious 20-year vision for getting housing built at a pace that meets local need and is affordable, whilst maintaining and building places that communities are proud to call their home.”

In line with national policy, brownfield development is to be prioritised over encroachment into the Green Belt wherever possible, preserving and promoting the quality of environment that the West of England enjoys.

The West of England Joint Plan consultation will open to the public on Monday 9 November and people have until January next year to tell the councils what they think of the proposals set out by housing and transport officers for discussion.

People can get involved by:
· Checking out the detail on the website http://www.jointplanningwofe.org.uk which contains information about the options, and the various ways that people can leave their views.
· Emailing comments or enquiries to comment@jointplanningwofe.org.uk
· Sending written comments to West of England Joint Planning Consultation
c/o South Gloucestershire Council, PO Box 299, Corporate Research and Consultation Team, Civic Centre, High Street, Kingswood, Bristol, BS15 0DR
· Attending one of a series of local events which will take place across the West of England over the coming weeks. Details are available from the website http://www.jointplanningwofe.org.uk
· Following a dedicated Twitter feed @WEJointPlanning which will provide updates on the consultation process and give your views using the #WEbuildourfuture hashtag.

The draft Joint Spatial Plan will be published in autumn 2016, and finally submitted to government in 2017. It could be formally adopted in early 2018.

For your information:
The West of England’s local authorities are committed to providing the homes and transport that the area needs. They are looking to plan for the future to help the area meet its housing and transport needs over the next 20 years and are starting the process by sharing information about various options about where housing and infrastructure could be provided.

The end result will be a locally-created plan that will be used by local authorities to guide housing, employment space and transport provision in their areas until 2036.

It is estimated 85,000 new homes are needed in the West of England area over the next 20 years. Of this, 56,000 homes are already “planned and predicted” – i.e. they are in projects with existing site allocations, sites with planning permissions, sites that are known to be ready for allocation or small sites likely to get planning permission.

Partners’ collective ambition is to drive sustainable economic growth and maintain a quality of life for people who live and work here. Providing the homes and infrastructure at the right level is an essential part of delivering this.

The area under consideration is the Wider Bristol Housing Market Area, and while Bath has its own Housing Market Area, it recognises the mutual benefits of working with its neighbours to deliver a plan across boundaries that will allow each authority to maintain the characteristics that make each special.
More information about the plan can be found at: www.jointplanningwofe.org.uk

Water is Best.

Water is Best.

Water is Best - in Ancient Greek.

‘Water is Best’ – in Ancient Greek. Click on images to enlarge.

We’ve been talking about Bath making more of its natural water heritage. Celebrating cold springs – and the meandering River Avon – as well as its thermal attractions.

I said Bath had put a banner headline high above the heads of the 4.8 million day tourists who visit the city each year.

Just below the proscenium arch on the Pump Room facade it says ‘Water is Best!’ – only it’s written in ancient Greek.

The Rebecca Fountain.

The Rebecca Fountain.

Well l had forgotten that there is another pro-water statement. Only this time you’ll have to bend down to see it.

It’s written – in English – on the base of the Rebecca (at the well) Fountain on the north side of Bath Abbey and facing Orange Grove.

'Water is best' - it says on the base.

‘Water is best’ – it says on the base.

It was erected by Bath Temperance Association in 1861 and ‘faced off’ all the ale-houses in the High Street.

It’s a white Sicilian marble statue and basin sitting on arcaded piers and looking a little like a church font.

Water hasn’t always continuously flowed from her pitcher over the years – and the fountain has been terribly vandalised – but it’s good to know she is now in working order and here the water of Bath is celebrated again.

I wonder how many meetings – how many stories – have begun or ended at her base