We’ve got it covered.

Another good news story for a wet and dull day. It’s that 1500 new trees have been planted on Lansdown escarpment edge extending the tree lined skyline around the city of Bath and improving the setting of the Cotswold AONB.

The project forms part of Bath & North East Somerset Council’s commitment to support the planting of 100,000 new trees across the district over the next two years, to help tackle the Climate Emergency and Ecological Emergency and enable the area to become carbon neutral by 2030.

A range of native species were planted including beech, hawthorn, yew, holly, field maple, bird cherry, goat willow and hazel.

Around half the trees were planted by a mixed group of volunteers and trainees from Grow For Life, a Bath-based charity which helps local people to build self-esteem, confidence and resilience through horticultural therapy and social interaction.

Councillor David Wood, joint cabinet member for Climate Emergency and Neighbourhood Services said: “This was a mammoth planting effort over two days by our contractors and the team from Grow For Life and I’d like to thank them for their hard work in the strong winds and heavy showers. I’m sure those that took part will get immense satisfaction knowing that their efforts will benefit the whole community for many, many years to come.”

Carey Skelton, Operations Manager at Grow for Life, said: “After three lockdowns this was a fantastic opportunity to get out of the house and do something really positive! Approximately 20 people planted almost 700 trees, knowing that the benefits of their personal endeavours will reach long into the future to the benefit of the whole community.”

The project was funded by a grant from the Forest of Avon, one of England’s Community Forests which aims to connect people with trees in their local area. Rather than a single forest the Forest of Avon is a combination of trees and woodlands across the West of England.

Visit the council’s Climate Emergency webpage.

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