Raising a glass to Thomas.

Exactly what was quenching the thirst of the people of Bath in the summer of  1856.   Turns out beverages sold by Thomas Steele (1805-1859) – a chemist at 6 Milsom Street in the city were hitting the right spot 160 years ago. Flavours that included gooseberry and mulberry.

This little snippet of social history comes via Bath Abbey’s Footprint Project – a multi-million pound scheme of works to make the Abbey floor safe and improve facilities in the church.

As part of the work volunteers are researching the hundreds of historic memorial stones in the building which will have to be lifted to allow the structural work to take place.

Thomas-Steele

Thomas Steele’s memorial stone.

Thanks to one of them, it’s been discovered that Thomas – one of thousands of people granted burial under the floor – once placed a notice in the Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette on 31 July 1856 advertising all types of flavours and included various ways on how these could be used to flavour tarts, jellies and spirits.

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He is one of the hundreds of Bathonians commemorated in the Abbey and researched for the Bath Abbey ledger stone project as part of #Footprintproject.

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You can visit the blog site of Abbey archivist, Anna Riggs to check out the advert: https://bathabbeyheritage.wordpress.com