Clear our footpaths!

Photo taken by Richard Williamson who says: 'PS I might also add that those ‘workmen’ signs leaning on the council office wall been there for many weeks to no obvious purpose.'
Ugly street furniture is the subject of a letter from Richard Williamson who writes:
‘I am the Caretaker for a prestigious building, built as the mansion of Earl Manvers (also Viscount Pierrepoint). This is No.1 Manvers Street, which is also right next to Lewes House – the council offices.
 
Recently, a third, piece of ugly street furniture (please see picture below) has joined two other pieces, greatly marring the aspect of this historic Grade II vista and causing much litter to be dropped – mostly by council employees going outside to smoke and people discarding take-away drinks etc. before entering the offices. I am now unable to reach the decorative trees behind it (almost obscured in the photo).
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Photo taken by Richard Williamson who says: ‘PS I might also add that those ‘workmen’ signs leaning on the council office wall been there for many weeks to no obvious purpose.’
 
Please would BANES consider moving at least the refuse bin (very recently placed there, having been moved from Henry Street) to a more discrete location, possibly in front of the council office door, through which many of the people currently using it are going. 
 
There are also two telephone cabinets. The contractors said that they were ‘for the Council’. I am sure that when the new one was placed there (the blacker one in the middle), the old one should have been taken away, rather than just left there redundant on its specially-provided plinth. I think that this is possibly just laziness.
 
It does seem wholly inappropriate to have such extensive clutter outside this important building which is much appreciated by residents, the businesses in the building and also – I am sure – the touristswho stop to read the large information sign (also placed outside the building, out of sight to the immediate right of the red door!).
 
This is actually the fourthpiece of street furniture outside the building!’