Bark attacker back in Queen Square

Clear evidence of freshly chewed bark!
Clear evidence of freshly chewed bark!

 

Bath Police have been informed about a new tree bark chewing attack in historic Queen Square where there is fresh evidence of dog activity.

Terry Basson
Terry Basson

The following email came from Terry Basson who first raised the issue on the Virtual Museum last year.

Then a sustained dog attack did extensive damage to the bark of many trees in the central garden where signs warn of a £100 fine if dogs are not kept on a lead.

One of the warning signs.
One of the warning signs.
Terry's own photograph of damage done to a tree yesterday - September 24th
Terry’s own photograph of damage done to a tree yesterday – September 24th

I was playing Pétanque over on Queen Square today and noticed the same guy with his black dog again chewing and ripping bark from the base of the large tree at the corner closest to the Victoria Park and at the bottom of Gay Street end.

I could not stand by like it seems all those responsible doing nothing, so I walked over to him and gave him a right telling off.

He said he had not noticed his dog chewing. I told him the dog should not be let off the lead.

Queen Square
Queen Square

He knew exactly what the dog was doing and he knows he can p**s all over the clearly published rules of dogs not allowed to be off their leads.

I felt so angry that I risked being caught up in a fight with a drunken man and his dog.

I am eighty years old but found the courage to try to deal with this without help from it seems our City Fathers who know all about this man’s unlawful behaviour .

The fresh damage is in the far corner of Queen Square - nearest Victoria Park.
The fresh damage is in the far corner of Queen Square – nearest Victoria Park.

Something in me wants to say again that the so called dog control unit is just never seen active in Queen Square.’

Bath Parks Department have reported the matter to the police.

Queen Square – constructed between 1729 and 1736  – was the first of the great sequence of urban spaces created by John Wood and his son. It culminated with the Royal Crescent some 40 years later.

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